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File: baf1ccfe0b4b4e8⋯.jpeg (214.12 KB, 1024x768, 4:3, antikythera-mechanism.jpeg)

 No.51211

How advanced were the ancient Greeks, really? We know about the Antikythera mechanism, which was a kind of analog computer used to predict various astronomical events, and was more advanced than anything we built until the 14th century. And Hero of Alexandria had discovered how to make a steam engine 2k years ago.

There's something fascinating about the idea that some lone genius might have come up with technology well ahead of its time, which was then lost and had to be rediscovered. Imagine some guy driving his steam-powered chariot around Athens in 100 BC while everyone else is still riding horses.

 No.51222

>Imagine some guy driving his steam-powered chariot around Athens in 100 BC while everyone else is still riding horses.

I was going to mention the lightbulbs of ancient Rome that lasted for hundreds of years, but you went full reddit with that last sentence.


 No.51225

If you think about it, the steam engine isn't really all that far-fetched for something the greeks to have. It's just steam pushing a wheel.


 No.51227

You know, with stuff like the Antikythera mechanism I feel there is something huge we aren't being told about or we flat out don't know about our past. Are you seriously telling me that for 200,000 years of homo sapiens, we spent 195,000 of those dicking around as cavemen? I agree with >>51225, are you telling me it took until the 1600s for people to realize that steam could provide power, and a further century for people to realize it could provide locomotion? Of course if you keep following this line of thought you end up barking dangerously near to the Tartar-tree which has become the church of Fomenko.

You know what I think?

I think human history is actually longer than we know. I think there may have been an advanced human society tens of thousands of years in the past that was almost entirely wiped out by a cataclysm approximately 12,800 years ago, aka the same cataclysm that is due to repeat imminently. Over the next 5 millennia they slowly rebuilt but then another smaller cataclysm destroyed most of what they'd done, so they returned to nomadic lifestyles until Mesopotamia could finally establish the beginnings of our present society.

When the reset does happen, those who survive need to preserve not only as much literature as they can, but pictographic dictionaries to show what each word means, and as unlikely as it might seem, one which shows the position of the tongue, teeth and throat for each sound. Otherwise we have zero hope of breaking this cycle and leaving this hellhole once and for all.


 No.51228

>>51227

The Korean writing system is like this. The consonants and vowel sounds are drawn to resemble mouth shape and tongue position.


 No.51229

>>51222

Thanks for reminding me of the perpetual lamps, good sir/madam! This page contains quotes from a 17th century book that listed a few ancient accounts of these mysterious lamps, some of which are said to have burned for thousands of years before being extinguished.

http://ciphermysteries.com/2008/07/30/wilkins-lib-ii-cap-x-of-subterranean-lamps

>>51225

>>51227

Well, according to the Egyptian priest who supposedly told Solon about Atlantis, there had been several cataclysms, caused by water and fire raining down from heaven; and the Egyptians remembered all of it, because their land had been mostly spared from the destruction, while Greece had been destroyed over and over again, and had lost the knowledge of who they were (had been).

http://classics.mit.edu/Plato/timaeus.html


 No.51361

The Antikythera mechanism isn't as complex as people have made it out to be. It's not a "computer", because it's not turing complete and doesn't have any capacity for being programmed. If it's a computer, so is a slide-rule. It doesn't "predict" anything that isn't already known to be a cyclic process like the movements of planets and eclipses. Essentially it just allowed the user to tell when the next event would take place without needing to do the math. It's just a robust clockwork version of a paper calendar, or (probably more to the point) a portable astronomer. The REALLY impressive thing about it is the engineering aspects: being able to cast bronze gears of that level of precision is INSANE in a pre-industrialized world.

But really, humans back then were just as smart as they are today, possibly more. A lot of knowledge of math and science was lost during the Dark Ages because of religious purges and plagues and feudalism.

>>51227

It becomes even weirder if you go farther back in human (or rather, hominid) history. Man discovered fire and was using it for warmth and I guess warding off wild animals for literally like 1.5 MILLION YEARS before they figured out how to use fire to cook food. It's unimaginable that in 1500 millennia none of these dumb fucks ever accidentally dropped their mammoth drumstick into the campfire, fished it out with a stick, and then found it to be crispy and delicious. But that's how it was. Before a globalized civilization, before written dissemination of knowledge across generations and across different cultures, things were discovered probably hundreds of thousands of times before they "stuck".


 No.51393

>>51361

The Church preserved knowledge anon, quit getting your history from reddit.


 No.51394

>>51393

They preserved only what they didn't destroy. Quit being a retard.


 No.51478

YouTube embed. Click thumbnail to play.

Ancients also had machines, more for show than function but still something for the time.


 No.51713

>>51393

Some monasteries preserved knowledge. The Church just burned everything. Big difference. Also, those monks wouldn't have had to preserve anything if all of civilization wasn't getting destroyed by the Church. What you're saying is like your family went around slaughtering an entire town of people, but meanwhile your little brother hid a few of them in the basement - therefore your family actually saved the town. Doesn't work that way.


 No.51718

File: cb800dd00f039af⋯.webm (2.66 MB, 720x480, 3:2, cb800dd00f039af254832462f….webm)

>>51361

>A lot of knowledge of math and science was lost during the Dark Ages because of religious purges and plagues and feudalism.

>Muh Dark Ages myth


 No.51838

>>51718

You don't belong here.


 No.51845

>>51227

> I think human history is actually longer than we know. I think there may have been an advanced human society tens of thousands of years in the past that was almost entirely wiped out by a cataclysm approximately 12,800 years ago, aka the same cataclysm that is due to repeat imminently. Over the next 5 millennia they slowly rebuilt but then another smaller cataclysm destroyed most of what they'd done, so they returned to nomadic lifestyles until Mesopotamia could finally establish the beginnings of our present society.

12800 - possible comet swarm across North America. Beginning of Younger Dryas.

9600 BC - end of Younger Dryas. Gobekli Tepe buried.

6200 BC - 8.2 kiloyear event https://amedleyofpotpourri.blogspot.com/2017/05/82-kiloyear-event.html

4700 BC - 4700 BC cooling event http://dispatchesfromturtleisland.blogspot.com/2012/09/climate-drives-history-big-picture-recap.html

3900 BC - 5.9 kiloyear event / Bond Event https://cof.quantumfuturegroup.org/events/5370

3100 BC - 3100 BC event, possible comet impact http://personal.eunet.fi/pp/tilmari/tilmari2.htm

2200 BC - 4.2 kiloyear event

1200 BC - Bronze Age Collapse http://etc.ancient.eu/interviews/what-caused-the-bronze-age-collapse/ http://www.explorethemed.com/BACollapse.asp

Any of these would have caused worldwide civilizational collapse. The Bronze Age Collapse and Trojan war were considered mythology until archaeologists discovered records of them. There were surely growing civilizations at the earlier events, but we have nothing to describe them.


 No.51849

File: 88abf78ccd53a2e⋯.jpg (161.97 KB, 987x1455, 329:485, comparative-chronology.jpg)

>>51845

Sometimes I've thought of making a website that would display the true chronology of our past, arranged like the one in this picture but in text format, with each time period/event linking to a page that explains in detail what happened. Maybe someday I'll do it, it's just a very time consuming job and I'm not sure I have the technical skills required.


 No.52705

>>51849

to do it truelly right we would need,use a different true dating systems,ie to work with anything new we honeypotver ,everything would need to be compared to cosmic start date of the universe itself,all entries should be in a database sql etc,


 No.52830

>>51849

you should do it


 No.52831

>>51849

>Egyptian Civilization

>3000 B.C.

Was predynastic Egypt not a civilization??


 No.52832

>>52831

I think it depends on your definition of civilization.


 No.52854

>>51211

Spoiler alert:

The device is not from the antikythera. Anything that old would be dust by now. it likely fell off of something else and happened to land on or near it.




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