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/ck/ - Food & Cooking

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File: 0cba558f2414957⋯.png (339.35 KB, 640x487, 640:487, 0cba558f24149570ddd47f08a6….png)

 No.13973

what cheese is good for grilled cheese sandwitches?

the one i have right now has almost no flavor, it's like i'm eating toast with rubber between it

 No.13975

>>13973

You must have been using American cheese-product slices. It isn't actually cheese, and can't legally be called cheese even in the United States. Try a real cheddar next time.


 No.13976

>>13973

>what cheese is good for grilled cheese sandwiches?

American. Anybody that tells you otherwise is full of shit, knows nothing about the practical use of cheese, and is just parroting stuff to seem more sophisticated.

Slices of American cheese product wouldn't be my first choice for a cheese snack alone, but nothing melts like 'murrican and it tastes better with the bread and butter than bland stuff like Swiss. As much as I love Cheddar I don't recommend it for grilled cheese sandwiches.


 No.13979

>>13976

Does American cheese works raw? It always seems to work better melted.


 No.13981

File: 5b8c3ffdbce8a43⋯.jpg (127.74 KB, 866x1390, 433:695, 5b8c3ffdbce8a43caf787c0050….jpg)


 No.13982

>>13981

>"lettuce".png


 No.13984

>>13979

no never use cheese product raw, I personally don't care for cheese product but I'll have me some munster and mozzarella on mine


 No.13985

>>13979

Kids sometimes eat singles as a cheap snack, if it keeps them away from candy and sweets that's fine I guess. Suppose you could also put it on crackers.

It's not great raw.


 No.13986

Sharp Cheddar


 No.13987

Combine multiple types.


 No.13988

>>13987

that sort of sounds like a good idea, but i just don't feel like buying additional cheese is necessary if i don't need it


 No.13989

Brie cheese with slices of pear or apple.


 No.13990

>>13989

I've never cared for brie, would it really work on a grilled cheese? what's a good way to have it?


 No.13991

>>13975

If you need cheese, just slice one piece from a block. It's cheaper to do that, anyway.


 No.13993

>>13990

That sandwich with pear.

I also like it with nectarines but I'm probably weird.


 No.13994

>>13993

I don't like brie either but what you're suggesting is not weird, I literally had everything you mentioned served at a plate at a bar last week.

I hope the bar owner enjoyed the fat margin he got, charged me out the ass for that plate.


 No.13998

>>13973

Cheddar


 No.14001

Chester

Cheddar

Jack (Monterey or Colby Jack for americans)

Gouda or Manchego if you like to throw money around


 No.14002

>>13988

You don't buy cheese for grilled cheese, you make grilled cheese when you have cheese that's getting older than you like.

>he doesn't have a fridge drawer with over half a dozen different kinds of cheese


 No.14006

Havarti, Swiss, look for melting cheeses.


 No.14007

File: b86dd66ab3c2122⋯.jpg (60.05 KB, 1280x720, 16:9, 1431310300455.jpg)

Muenster on Sourdough.


 No.14009

idk swiss?

don't restaurants usually use cheddar?


 No.14011

>>13988

>doesn't know what a three cheese blend is

its like a thing

i forget if it's the more moldy it is, the more stringy it is or it was something else.


 No.14016

>>13976

>American """"cheese""""

>>13973

If you're making a grilled cheese sandwich I think my ideal choice would be brie. Brie and turkey on a grilled cheese sandwich is a great combination. The also acceptable list of cheeses

>Cheddar

>Gouda

>Provolone

>Mozzarella

>Goat

>Havarti

>Muenster

>Gruyere

>Or any other cheese that you like, really

I really like a good hard, nutty cheese, but it can be difficult to get the cheese hot enough to melt without burning your bread. I would advise using a softer cheese to make cooking easier. There are also no rules as to what you can put on your grilled cheese besides cheese. So consider adding sliced tomato, salami, ham, onions, sun dried tomatoes, spinach, etc. You also don't have to pick just one cheese! Just promise me for the love of God that you won't use American cheese. It's an insult to even pretend that it's cheese or even comparable to cheese.


 No.14018

>>13976

>Amerimutt "cheese"

Have some self-respect. Anyone who willingly eats that garbage is subhuman.

>>13973

Use sharp chedder, swiss, jack cheese (pepper jack is pretty nice), or mozzarella.


 No.14019

>>14018

>hides flag

>kosher poster✓

I hate that processed garbage as well Rabbi but how's the weather in Tel'Aviv?


 No.14020

>>14019

Have to use Tor to post from work, retard. I came in this thread because anyone who suggests using processed deserves a bullying.


 No.14023

>>14020

Yes as is protocol, don't let the goyim know.


 No.14024

File: fdbf09fcd1383a1⋯.jpg (58.9 KB, 349x245, 349:245, fdbf09fcd1383a1eb50d459617….jpg)

>>14019

>Jewish conspiracy to advocate against american cheese

challah instead of sourdough then sure but come on now


 No.14025

>>14024

if he had suggested challah*

I'm losing braincells by the minute


 No.14026

>>14024

TBH fam I want to have my cheese whiz on top of matzo. truly a meal fit for the chosen


 No.14034

>>14007

If toasted with butter that sounds beautiful.


 No.14039

>>14034

>Sour with bitter in dairy snack

>Toasted and butter post-heat

It sounds like torture


 No.14047

>>14039

I could exclude the sourdough myself, plain white bread with Muenster, fried onions+jalapenos, topped with mozzarella cheese.


 No.14048

>>14034

Oh it is.


 No.14065

File: f775f4645687524⋯.png (254.81 KB, 637x277, 637:277, product-singles-detail.png)

>>13973

>what cheese is good for grilled cheese sandwitches?


 No.14068

>>14065

>suggesting Pasteurized Prepared cheese product

That ain't cheese. We already went over this.


 No.14069

>>14065

A FUCKING LEAF


 No.14072


 No.14074

>>14068

Shut up cuck


 No.14076

>>14047

>jalapenos

>american mozzarella

Just stick with the muenster, lots of pepper and a few marinated onions

I think the strong muenster is the protagonist of any grilled cheese that has it


 No.14077

>>14076

could be Oaxaca instead, but that's a lot more expensive here


 No.14078

File: 6a9f3ce6db1d39a⋯.jpg (26.89 KB, 450x450, 1:1, 23b4ff68-3017-481f-8df0-8b….jpg)

>>14077

>Oaxaca

>For grilled cheese

>Oaxaca

>More expensive than Muenster

>Oaxaca

>Good

We don't even use it for the quesadillas as the regular market one lacks flavor, texture and serve presentation.

Now that i think of it Oaxaca looks and feels very much like the artificial cheese you guys get sold as mozzarella

Just stick to Colby, its flavor, texture and fatty after-effects (no butter needed) make it a good choice. To me it sounds like you want the cheese as the side-note for the savory fillings. Noble but mistaken, grilled cheese has the objective in the name. You think of a dairy sandwich.


 No.14079

>>14078

I like Oaxaca and mozzarella but you've piqued my interest, what good cheeses do you have over in Mexico?


 No.14083

Anyone who honestly suggests american "cheese" deserves to be taken out back and shot.


 No.14084

File: c3fa275b2f17d04⋯.jpg (70.42 KB, 650x447, 650:447, Mennonite holding mennonit….jpg)

File: 879e6f284f089e7⋯.jpg (28.33 KB, 600x337, 600:337, cocio.jpg)

File: bff14548806d46d⋯.jpg (132.85 KB, 1280x857, 1280:857, No tan frejco.jpg)

File: 6e23ed1f2f6b79e⋯.jpg (163.79 KB, 1152x768, 3:2, frito.jpg)

File: 9d23637ab59f509⋯.jpg (142.96 KB, 1440x810, 16:9, requejon.jpg)

>>14079

Certainly not Oaxaca, as a quick side-note down the central/south of mexico most rural folks don't know how to make cheese, and the aforementioned is one of the few well done ones (and with an interesting presentation) but that's about it, the overrated nature comes from massive marketing, and the commercial version loses plenty of properties of the original (which is pretty expensive for what is worth)

The northern half has the best cheese due to being the rural sector. The most famous one has to be the Chihuahua, which is nothing more than a mild chester with great texture. The best (and real) variant is the one made by its original makers, the mennonites, this one is called Mennonite cheese (Menonita). Tons of flavor, creamy but can go hefty lengths in terms of fusion/melted threads. This is the man's man pick for dinner/strong quesadillas.

Then you have the Asadero variant, which is a fresh and less savory version but makes it up for its use alongside meats and pickled stuff, along with the price. Don't be fooled friend, many rats and peasants will tell you this is the same as Oaxaca, a normal opinion between the ignorant, bloodthirsty class. The elaboration process varies and the milk used here contains much more fats/solids. This is the usual pick for quesadillas at commercial street level.

And the real ones which cannot be flavored normally, the local handmade ones, sometimes called artisan so they can charge you 40% more. You have 2 to 3 variants, the fresco (fresh), the cocido (boiled) and a regional variant, usually called regional depending on the region, which can lead to massive confusion at times, won't tackle those because they are plenty, and usually just copies of european variants.

Going to the point, the cocido ones somewhat vary but at least in the northwest (american southwest) they are similar enough: medium-high fat content, somewhat acid but not that much, cooked in its own whey (which is kinda sour) for around half an hour at 60 degrees, so not really boiled and mildly pasteurized, basic form of presentation are thin discs due to its softness, tortilla-shaped if you like. Very creamy stuff but makes lots of threads, flavor is raw milk with acid tones. This is the usual pick for breakfast quesadillas, but it's also tough to find in non-rural areas and tougher outside the region because there's no preservatives, quantity to ship it well and it's illegal in America due to lack of papers/registration. It's like buying oranges to the guy outside the gas station, except these ones are actually from your city/town, don't rob you, aren't illiterate and aren't escaping from a dark criminal past.

Then the fresco one, there's not a lot to say about this bad boy, or maybe i say this because all latin america has an almost identical variant. This is your standard operation freshly-made usual cheese, can be pasteurized or not, one tastes like salty milk, the other as simply bittersweet raw milk, all of them are moist and squishy. The commercial variant popular in the country (and maybe the only one sold at national scale) is the Panela variant, which is a pasteurized cheese, firmer than usual, tastes like slightly less salty milk. The charm comes from the recipes featuring this as a dresser/accompaniment, the side-product and the mere idea of munching a chunk of soft cheese without feeling bad. Also highly illegal in America due to its informal nature, i heard some injuns in Arizona and New Mexico still make and sell them in the local stores. You can make quesadillas with this but you need to fry it (no, not the deep fry) in sizeable slices, usually served in maize tortilla with strong accompaniments, either northern chorizo or meat. Many caribbeans and central americans love that fry method, they call it simply Queso Frito (Fried Cheese)

The side-product is the funny part, the Requeson, which is basically a sweet but soggier ricotta of subtle flavor in its most usual presentation. While some people might buy a small portion of cottage cheese, the real players buy a kilo of requeson with the same money. A by-product by some producers, this one is cheap due to going foul quickly even if pasteurized, and adding preservatives for packaging makes a mess. Hence why lots of people erroneously don't buy it, this is the main culprit in cases of the formidable Brucellosis, which appears in any unpasteurized product instead of just foul ones as it is in the animal. The sickness itself just fucks your shit up eternally if you eat uncooked products from infected cattle or goats.

There has to be more kinds of cheese, but right now that's on top of my head. TL;DR local chester (Chihuahua, Mennonite), Asadero, Cocido


 No.14085

>>14084

I'll look into asadero because I think I can get that in the states but it might be mozzarella or Oaxaca under a different name, kinda like black forest ham…. Requeson seems like a great deal if you cook the cheese and use it in shit like pies.


 No.14086

File: f448f9db4b4f87f⋯.jpg (192 KB, 1400x927, 1400:927, mobcake.jpg)

>>14085

>it might be mozzarella or Oaxaca under a different name

It usually is, here in narcoland we have an omnipresent brand called Lala, they sell pretty clean and cheap stuff, but their cheese line is a complete mess as they all use the same pasteurized milk with the same solid/acid/fat stats.

You can buy a manchego, a mozzarella, an asadero and they will all taste roughly the same, which is complete and utter madness. They taste decent enough thou.

Knowing your national cheese market, which i frankly like when they sell local variants (Colby), i think you will find a real Asadero in some of those frontier brands, not the shitcano brands that will tell you Oaxaca is the same thing. Problem is finding said brand.

Honestly i would ask around for a good brand, and being much more honest, in my personal experience, i trust certain blue eyed blonde haired suburban reel americans much more than chicanos in terms of food recommendations because they are not biased and some of them usually buy/taste all the brands before sticking to one. Never ask a chicano about food, those guys are weird as hell and usually everything they believe in terms of food is wrong, or they steal it and call it their own.

>if you cook the cheese and use it in shit like pies

You are completely spot-on. Many have used it as filling for sweets, and in other countries they are basically the sweet itself. The arabs and italians (or sicilians?) have the Cassata, the sweet ricotta cake with sliced fruit.

Never seen it locally as it is considered madness due to requeson being usually associated with grilled meat, northern chorizo, fat tortillas, beans, guacamole, so on and so on. It's like telling someone about making a sponge cake with fish.


 No.14089

>>14086

I would think to use it in a spinach pie, thank you for the information.


 No.14099

I like to use havarti because of its buttery flavor and it is a great melting cheese. You can also use low moisture mozzarella. These typically pair well with a sharp cheddar in grilled cheeses for the flavor.


 No.14100

>>14084

>frito

This looks fucking delicious. I've had some similar fried cheese in Greece which smelled really good but only had a few miserable grill lines on top.


 No.14103

File: 69c69d21beeb094⋯.webm (3.78 MB, 640x360, 16:9, Frying Cheese.webm)

>>14100

It's a guilty pressure in most of latin america, the kind of stuff you can only eat once a week due to the amounts of fat

Usually fried with standard vegetable oil, but when i ate some in Colombia (by a venezuelan) they fried it with lard and served it with a version of chicharron (pork rind with meat attached)

WEBM related shows how piss easy the recipe is


 No.14104

>>14103

>It's a guilty pressure in most of latin america

>guilty pressure

Is it measured in Pensées instead of Pascals?


 No.14111

>>14104

Very funny monkey king, i didn't proof read and put pressure instead of pleasure


 No.14113

A farmer's Brick cheese (such as Guggisberg Brick or any of the Amish farms Brick (not Butter) cheese) melts very nicely, maintains a full-bodied flavor even in high heat, and the texture is (for a solid cheese) quite pleasing. Works nicely on pizza as a substitute for mozzarella. Cheers.


 No.14114

Just made a grilled cheese with American cheese product, to see what it would be like. Not the worst thing in the world, but the sweet, mild flavor of the cheese just leaves something to be desired. On the other hand, the smooth texture is perfect for being melted. Everything about this style of 'cheese' is like it was specifically made for children.


 No.14127

Underrated: Blue Waffle


 No.14132

>>14016

this and correct order




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